Glowing Green Platypi

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Photo Courtesy of Disney

He’s a semi aquatic Egg laying mammal of action.

Matthew Boughter, Journalist

Scientists have recently discovered that the platypus has fluorescent fur. People can’t see it because it is on a spectrum of light not visible to the human eyes, but when put under a UV light, platypi glow a bright blueish green.

A Platypus Under UV Light (Photo Courtesy of Science News)

The platypus is a strange animal all around. They are mammals that lay eggs, have beaver-like tails and duck bills, and they even have poisonous spikes on their hind legs making them one of the only 4 known venomous mammals on Earth.

Paula Anich, the lead of the study says “I was a little flabbergasted to see the platypus is biofluorescent, especially since it’s already such a unique animal.”

I was a little flabbergasted to see the platypus is biofluorescent, especially since it’s already such a unique animal.”

— Paula Anich

Platypi aren’t the only animals that have biofluorescence though. According to National Geographic, “In just the past few years, scientists have discovered that several types of sea turtle shells, fungi, and flying squirrels are biofluorescent. Though the reasons are unknown, hypotheses include camouflage or communication between individuals of the same species.”

The only problem is that scientists have no idea why the platypus glows. Anich predicts that it may function as a sort of camouflage against predators that see UV light. But it may be a natural mutation that has no effect on the organism like how they still lay eggs.

The real question is: How the heck did Disney know about this when they made Phineas and Ferb and why didn’t they tell anyone?